All courses are subject to change. Please check the class search function for complete listing details.


GIScience + MA Certificate

*Students pursuing the GIScience minor or MAPSS GIScinence certificate may use the following courses to satisfy their program requirements.

GEOG 27100/37100
Cartographic Design and Geovisualization
Crystal Bae

This course is a hands-on introduction to core principles and techniques associated with cartographic design, especially with regards to digital map design and the geographic visualization of data. Main topics include map generalization, symbology, scale, visual variables, scales of measurement, 2D and 3D design, map animation and interaction, and web mapping. Students will work with open-source GIS software and web tools, culminating in a final project and peer critique.

GEOG 28204/38204 (ARCH 28402)
Geographic Information Science II
Marynia Kolak

This course investigates the theory and practice of infrastructure and computational
approaches in spatial analysis and GIScience. Geocomputation is introduced as a
multidisciplinary systems paradigm necessary for solving complex spatial problems and facilitating new understandings. Students will learn about the elements of spatial algorithms and data structures, geospatial topologies, spatial data queries, and the basics of geodatabase architecture and design.

Prerequisites: GEOG 28202 /GEOG 38202. Students must receive a grade of C or higher in GEOG 28202/GEOG 38202 in order to register for this course.
 

GEOG 28700/GEOG 38700 (ENST 28800)
Readings in Spatial Analysis
This independent reading option is an opportunity to explore special topics in the exploration, visualization and statistical modeling of geospatial data.

GEOG 49000
Reading/Research: Geographic Information Sciences
Independent study for graduate students interested in Geographic Information Sciences (GIS). Students and instructors can arrange a Reading/Research course when the material being studied goes beyond the scope of a particular course, when students are working on material not covered in an existing course, or when students would like to receive academic credit for independent research. Subject, course of study, and requirements must be arranged with the instructor.


GEOG Majors

*Fourth-year Geographical Sciences majors may use the following courses to satisfy the major requirements. First- through Third-year students who intend to pursue the major are encouraged to discuss their course selections with Professors Brenner or Shaikh.

GEOG 27100/37100
Cartographic Design and Geovisualization
Crystal Bae

This course is a hands-on introduction to core principles and techniques associated with cartographic design, especially with regards to digital map design and the geographic visualization of data. Main topics include map generalization, symbology, scale, visual variables, scales of measurement, 2D and 3D design, map animation and interaction, and web mapping. Students will work with open-source GIS software and web tools, culminating in a final project and peer critique.
GEOG 28204/38204 (ARCH 28402)

Geographic Information Science II
Marynia Kolak

This course investigates the theory and practice of infrastructure and computational
approaches in spatial analysis and GIScience. Geocomputation is introduced as a
multidisciplinary systems paradigm necessary for solving complex spatial problems and facilitating new understandings. Students will learn about the elements of spatial algorithms and data structures, geospatial topologies, spatial data queries, and the basics of geodatabase architecture and design.

Prerequisites: GEOG 28202 /GEOG 38202. Students must receive a grade of C or higher in GEOG 28202/GEOG 38202 in order to register for this course.

GEOG 23500/33500 (ENST 24660; ARCH 24660)
Urban Geography
Michael Conzen

This course examines the spatial organization and current restructuring of modern cities in light of the economic, social, cultural, and political forces that shape them. It explores the systematic interactions between social process and physical system. We cover basic concepts of urbanism and urbanization, systems of cities, urban growth, migration, centralization and decentralization, land-use dynamics, physical geography, urban morphology, and planning. Field trip in Chicago region required.

SOCI 20116 (GEOG 20116; HMRT 20116; LLSO 20116; PBPL 27099)
Global-Local Politics
Terry Clark

Globalizing and local forces are generating a new politics in the United States and around the world. This course explores this new politics by mapping its emerging elements: the rise of social issues, ethno-religious and regional attachments, environmentalism, gender and life-style identity issues, new social movements, transformed political parties and organized groups, and new efforts to mobilize individual citizens.

SOCI 20521 (GEOG 20521; ENST 20521)
Sociology of Urban Planning: Cities, Territories, Environments
Neil Brenner
This course provides a high-intensity introduction to the sociology of urban planning practice under modern capitalism. Building upon urban sociology, planning theory and history as well as urban social science and environmental studies, we explore the emergence, development and continual transformation of urban planning in relation to changing configurations of capitalist urbanization, modern state power, sociopolitical insurgency and environmental crisis. Following an initial exploration of divergent conceptualizations of “planning” and “urbanization,” we investigate the changing sites and targets of planning; struggles regarding the instruments, goals and constituencies of planning; the contradictory connections between planning and diverse configurations of power in modern society (including class, race, gender and sexuality); and the possibility that new forms of planning might help produce more socially just and environmentally sane forms of urbanization in the future.