All courses are subject to change. Please check the class search function for complete listing details.


GIScience + MA Certificate

*Students pursuing the GIScience minor or MAPSS GIScinence certificate may use the following courses to satisfy their program requirements.

GEOG 27102
Spatial Cognition
Crystal Bae

GEOG 28000/GEOG 38000
GIScience Practicum
Luc Anselin

This applied course in geographic information science builds upon and refines knowledge and geocomputational expertise gained in the GIScience sequence. Students will develop amultifaceted GIS project incorporating spatial thinking in design, infrastructure, and implementation. Projects could include the development of a web application, dynamic dashboard, interactive storytelling map, infographic-driven policy brief, or research article and are encouraged to link additional disciplines like health, sociology, economics, or political science. Prerequisites: GIS I and II.

GEOG 28602/38602
Geographic Information Science III
Marynia Kolak

This advanced course extends and connects both foundational and functional GIScience concepts. Students will be introduced to advanced programming and scripting languages necessary for spatial analysis and GIScience applications. Additional topics include customization, enterprise GIS, web GIS, and advanced visualization and analytic techniques.
Prerequisites
GEOG 38202 and GEOG 38402. Students must receive a grade of C or higher in GEOG 28402/GEOG 38402 in order to register for this course.
 

GEOG 28702/38702 (ARCH 28702; ENST 28702; SOCI 20283; SOCI 30283)
Introduction to GIS and Spatial Analysis
Crystal Bae

This course provides an introduction and overview of how spatial thinking is translated into specific methods to handle geographic information and the statistical analysis of such information. This is not a course to learn a specific GIS software program, but the goal is to learn how to think about spatial aspects of research questions, as they pertain to how the data are collected, organized and transformed, and how these spatial aspects affect statistical methods. The focus is on research questions relevant in the social sciences, which inspires the selection of the particular methods that are covered. Examples include spatial data integration (spatial join), transformations between different spatial scales (overlay), the computation of "spatial" variables (distance, buffer, shortest path), geovisualization, visual analytics, and the assessment of spatial autocorrelation (the lack of independence among spatial variables). The methods will be illustrated by means of open source software such as QGIS and R.

GEOG 28700/GEOG 38700 (ENST 28800)
Readings in Spatial Analysis
This independent reading option is an opportunity to explore special topics in the exploration, visualization and statistical modeling of geospatial data.
 

GEOG 41800
History of City Planning
Emily Talen

GEOG 49000
Reading/Research: Geographic Information Sciences
Independent study for graduate students interested in Geographic Information Sciences (GIS). Students and instructors can arrange a Reading/Research course when the material being studied goes beyond the scope of a particular course, when students are working on material not covered in an existing course, or when students would like to receive academic credit for independent research. Subject, course of study, and requirements must be arranged with the instructor.


GEOG Majors

*Fourth-year Geographical Sciences majors may use the following courses to satisfy the major requirements. First- through Third-year students who intend to pursue the major are encouraged to discuss their course selections with Professors Brenner or Shaikh.

 

GEOG 28602/38602
Geographic Information Science III
Marynia Kolak

This advanced course extends and connects both foundational and functional GIScience concepts. Students will be introduced to advanced programming and scripting languages necessary for spatial analysis and GIScience applications. Additional topics include customization, enterprise GIS, web GIS, and advanced visualization and analytic techniques.
Prerequisites
GEOG 38202 and GEOG 38402. Students must receive a grade of C or higher in GEOG 28402/GEOG 38402 in order to register for this course.

GEOG 28702/38702 (ARCH 28702; ENST 28702; SOCI 20283; SOCI 30283)
Introduction to GIS and Spatial Analysis
Crystal Bae

This course provides an introduction and overview of how spatial thinking is translated into specific methods to handle geographic information and the statistical analysis of such information. This is not a course to learn a specific GIS software program, but the goal is to learn how to think about spatial aspects of research questions, as they pertain to how the data are collected, organized and transformed, and how these spatial aspects affect statistical methods. The focus is on research questions relevant in the social sciences, which inspires the selection of the particular methods that are covered. Examples include spatial data integration (spatial join), transformations between different spatial scales (overlay), the computation of "spatial" variables (distance, buffer, shortest path), geovisualization, visual analytics, and the assessment of spatial autocorrelation (the lack of independence among spatial variables). The methods will be illustrated by means of open source software such as QGIS and R.

SOCI 20252 (ENST 20252; ARCH 20252; SOCI 30252)
Urban Innovation: Cultural Place Making and Scenescapes
Terry Clark

Activists from Balzac, Jane Jacobs, and others today seek to change the world using the arts. Ignored by most social science theories, these new cultural initiatives and policies are increasing globally. Urban planning and architecture policies, walking and parades, posters and demonstrations, new coffee shops and storefront churches reinforce selective development of specific cities and neighborhoods. These transform our everyday social environments into new types of scenes. They factor into crucial decisions, about where to work, to open a business, to found a political activist group, to live, what political causes to support, and more. The course reviews new case studies and comparative analyses from China to Chicago to Poland that detail these processes. Students are encouraged to explore one type of project.