All courses are subject to change. Please check the class search function for complete listing details.


GIScience + MA Certificate

*Students pursuing the GIScience minor or MAPSS GIScinence certificate may use the following courses to satisfy their program requirements.

ENST 24600 (GEOG 24600; GEOG 34600; PBPL 24605; SOCI 20285)
Introduction to Urban Sciences
T Th 12:30-1:50; Luis Bettencourt
This course is a grand tour of conceptual frameworks, general phenomena, emerging data and policy applications that define a growing scientific integrated understanding of cities and urbanization.

It starts with a general outlook of current worldwide explosive urbanization and associated changes in social, economic and environmental indicators. It then introduces a number of historical models, from sociology, economics and geography that have been proposed to understand how cities operate. We will discuss how these and other facets of cities can be integrated as dynamical complex systems and derive their general characteristics as social networks embedded in structured physical spaces. Resulting general properties of cities will be illustrated in different geographic and historical contexts, including an understanding of urban resource flows, emergent institutions and the division of labor and knowledge as drivers of innovation and economic growth.

The second part of the course will deal with issues of inequality, heterogeneity and (sustainable) growth in cities. We will explore how these features of cities present different realities and opportunities to different individuals and how these appear as spatially concentrated (dis)advantage that shape people’s life courses. We will show how issues of inequality also have consequences at more macroscopic levels and derive the general features of population and economic growth for systems of cities and nations.

GEOG 28202/GEOG 38202 (ARCH 28202)
Geographic Information Science I
T Th 11-12:20; Crystal Bae
This course introduces students to a wide range of geospatial technologies and techniques in order to explain the basic theory and application of geographic information systems (GIS). To do this, students will use open source or free software such as QGIS and Google Earth Pro to complete GIS lab exercises that cover a range of topics, including an introduction to different types of geospatial data, geographic measurement, GIS, principles of cartography, remote
sensing, basic GIS mapping and spatial analysis techniques, remote sensing, and specific geospatial applications such as 3D modeling and geodesign. By providing a general overview of geospatial technologies, this course provides students with a broad foundational knowledge of the field of GIScience that prepares them for more specialized concepts and applications covered in future GIS courses.

GEOG 28700/GEOG 38700 (ENST 28800)
Readings in Spatial Analysis
This independent reading option is an opportunity to explore special topics in the exploration, visualization and statistical modeling of geospatial data.

GEOG 49000
Reading/Research: Geographic Information Sciences
Independent study for graduate students interested in Geographic Information Sciences (GIS). Students and instructors can arrange a Reading/Research course when the material being studied goes beyond the scope of a particular course, when students are working on material not covered in an existing course, or when students would like to receive academic credit for independent research. Subject, course of study, and requirements must be arranged with the instructor.

SOCI 20500/30253 (GEOG 20500/30500)
Introduction to Spatial Data Science
Luc Anselin MW 1:30-2:50

Spatial data science consists of a collection of concepts and methods drawn from both statistics and computer science that deal with accessing, manipulating, visualizing, exploring and reasoning about geographical data. The course introduces the types of spatial data relevant in social science inquiry and reviews a range of methods to explore these data. Topics covered include formal spatial data structures, geovisualization and visual analytics, rate smoothing, spatial autocorrelation, cluster detection and spatial data mining. An important aspect of the course is to learn and apply open source software tools, including R and GeoDa.
 


GEOG Majors

*Fourth-year Geographical Sciences majors may use the following courses to satisfy the major requirements. First- through Third-year students who intend to pursue the major are encouraged to discuss their course selections with Professors Brenner or Shaikh.

ENST 24550 (GEOG 24550)
Urban Ecology in the Great Nearby
MW 1:30-2:50; Alison Anastasio

Places like the Great Barrier Reef, Great Smoky Mountains, or Great Outdoors elicit ideas of a nature that is far away and often presumed to be “pristine.” Not only are these presumptions worthy of interrogation, but they may limit our understanding of the natural world that is in close proximity to humans. In this course students will use our restricted geographical movement during a pandemic as an opportunity to focus on hyperlocal urban ecology: that of the Great Nearby. What can we learn about our neighborhood and its human and non-human residents through close observation in a finite geographic area? What are the benefits, scientifically and socially, of understanding the Great Nearby? What are the challenges of place-based ecology, especially in scaling up to make regional and global connections? Using an ecological lens to investigate the urban landscape up close, students will learn the importance of observation as it relates to forming hypotheses to understand the world, as well as revealing the urban natural world that we may not have noticed before. Grounded in the rigor of urban ecology, place-based research, long-term monitoring, and their application, students are expected to be actively outdoors in their local urban environment throughout the quarter.

Remote course with an expectation that students will be able to make multiple observations weekly in a ~2 block radius of their urban location. If students are in Chicago, some activities/assignments may take place outside (safely, with masks and physical distance) close to campus. Alternative assignments/methods of participation will be available to those who are not in Chicago. This course is intended to be complementary to ENST 23550 and does not require it as a prerequisite.

ENST 24600 (GEOG 24600; GEOG 34600; PBPL 24605; SOCI 20285)
Introduction to Urban Sciences
T Th 12:30-1:50; Luis Bettencourt

This course is a grand tour of conceptual frameworks, general phenomena, emerging data and policy applications that define a growing scientific integrated understanding of cities and urbanization.

It starts with a general outlook of current worldwide explosive urbanization and associated changes in social, economic and environmental indicators. It then introduces a number of historical models, from sociology, economics and geography that have been proposed to understand how cities operate. We will discuss how these and other facets of cities can be integrated as dynamical complex systems and derive their general characteristics as social networks embedded in structured physical spaces. Resulting general properties of cities will be illustrated in different geographic and historical contexts, including an understanding of urban resource flows, emergent institutions and the division of labor and knowledge as drivers of innovation and economic growth.

The second part of the course will deal with issues of inequality, heterogeneity and (sustainable) growth in cities. We will explore how these features of cities present different realities and opportunities to different individuals and how these appear as spatially concentrated (dis)advantage that shape people’s life courses. We will show how issues of inequality also have consequences at more macroscopic levels and derive the general features of population and economic growth for systems of cities and nations.

GEOG 29801
BA Colloquium I
W 10:30-1:20; Marynia Kolak
T 12:30-3:20; Sabina Shaikh

MW 4:30-5:50; Emily Talen
This colloquium is designed to aid students in their thesis research. Students are exposed to different conceptual frameworks and research strategies. The class meets weekly. GEOG majors will receive recommendations about which section to take.

GEOG 26100/GEOG 36100 (HIST 28900; HIST 38900; ENST 26100)
Roots of the Modern American City
T TH 9:30-10:50; Michael Conzen

This course traces the economic, social, and physical development of the city in North America from pre-European times to the mid-twentieth century. We emphasize evolving regional urban systems, the changing spatial organization of people and land use in urban areas, and the developing distinctiveness of American urban landscapes. All-day Illinois field trip required. This course is part of the College Course Cluster, Urban Design.

GEOG 28202/GEOG 38202 (ARCH 28202)
Geographic Information Science I
T Th 11-12:20; Crystal Bae

This course introduces students to a wide range of geospatial technologies and techniques in order to explain the basic theory and application of geographic information systems (GIS). To do this, students will use open source or free software such as QGIS and Google Earth Pro to complete GIS lab exercises that cover a range of topics, including an introduction to different types of geospatial data, geographic measurement, GIS, principles of cartography, remote
sensing, basic GIS mapping and spatial analysis techniques, remote sensing, and specific geospatial applications such as 3D modeling and geodesign. By providing a general overview of geospatial technologies, this course provides students with a broad foundational knowledge of the field of GIScience that prepares them for more specialized concepts and applications covered in future GIS courses.

GEOG 42400 (SOCI 30303)
Urban Landscape as Social Text
T 12:30-3:20; Michael Conzen

This seminar explores the meanings found in varieties of urban landscapes, both in the context of individual elements and composite structures. These meanings are examined in relation to three fundamental approaches that can be identified in the analytical literature on landscapes: normative, historical, and communicative modes of conceptualization. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the explicitly visual features of the urban landscape. Students pursue research topics of their own choosing within the general framework. PQ: Advanced standing and consent of instructor.

SOCI 20500 (GEOG 20500)
Introduction to Spatial Data Science
Luc Anselin MW 1:30-2:50

Spatial data science consists of a collection of concepts and methods drawn from both statistics and computer science that deal with accessing, manipulating, visualizing, exploring and reasoning about geographical data. The course introduces the types of spatial data relevant in social science inquiry and reviews a range of methods to explore these data. Topics covered include formal spatial data structures, geovisualization and visual analytics, rate smoothing, spatial autocorrelation, cluster detection and spatial data mining. An important aspect of the course is to learn and apply open source software tools, including R and GeoDa.